Voice & Impact

Creating Content is Not a Business Model

January 09, 2023 Adam Schneider Episode 4
Voice & Impact
Creating Content is Not a Business Model
Show Notes Transcript

Are you tired of feeling like you have to constantly churn out content in order to be a successful entrepreneur? It's time to challenge the idea that content creation is everything in the business world. While it's important to amplify your message, it's even more crucial to build genuine relationships with people. Without a foundation of authentic connections, all the content in the world won't make a difference in your business.

But it's not just about relationships – it's also about understanding your business model and knowing what to do with the attention you'll gain. Let's talk about the role of your unique voice, discernment, and real-world interactions in the development of your business. Before you get caught up in the hustle of constantly creating, take a step back and think about your priorities. Tune in to learn how focusing on building meaningful connections can take your business to the next level.

Adam:

I mean, very directly content is bullshit if you don't care about relationships. And so for those creative entrepreneurs who are crushing it and not showing up, Online. I think sometimes we forget that there is a real world out there. Hey friends. Welcome to Voice and Impact, an honest podcast about the journey of entrepreneurship. We're not here to tell you how to live your life. We're here to have real conversations about real things. My name is Adam, and I'm so grateful you're here with

Alysha:

us. I'm seeing sort of two sides of the conversation and one side being that you. Content is like the most important thing in your business. Like everything's about being online and like creating the content. And then I met some very successful creative entrepreneurs who have virtually like no social media presence or don't put a high emphasis on it, and they're still crushing it. And so I'm wondering where do you guys fall on the spectrum of opinion and why do you feel this way about, um, social and where can we go with.

Adam:

Yeah, I mean, very directly content is bullshit if you don't care about relationships. And so for those creative entrepreneurs who are crushing it and not showing up online, I think sometimes we forget that there is a real world out there that isn't online at all. Right? Like we can go out and meet people of aligned values. We can go out and find people who are, who are seeking solution. That you can offer like that can happen in the tangible physical world and content has nothing to do with it. And so for me, the framework of business and frankly the framework of me as a human being, It's all about relationships. It's all about genuinely getting to know the people that you serve on a first name basis, what they care about in their life, what they're actively pursuing in their life, and then synthesizing all that information to discover and determine how do you fit into the equation without that content is noise. I wouldn't say content is everything, and I would say it totally depends on. Your sort of business model, right? Like content is certainly more relevant if you are somebody who has an infrastructure that's ready for scalability. In other words, you can handle thousands of users, whereas content is a little bit re less relevant if you are like a, you know, a mom and pop. Um, shop where it's like, really all you do is sell locally and it's only at a certain capacity. So it really depends on your business model, your scalability and relationships. Right. But, but generally speaking, you know, the process of entrepreneurialism is all about getting out there and articulating yourself. It's. Seeking and discovering opportunities like looking around your environment and going, oh, that's an opportunity that I can serve. Or, oh, that's an opportunity that I can serve and discerning if it's an opportunity or not, if it's worth your attention or it's not. Do I have value here to contribute that is genuine or do I not? You know, they're all tools. It's all just different tools. You can use social media as a tool to one, try to get more. To get comfortable with the process of articulating your ideas, but I've always found having real time interaction with real people is always more valuable on my process of refining my message and refining my life cycles and sales processes. And contribution than any almost anything else, which is why for me personally, all of my content is a byproduct of that realtime interaction. So this is where you as an entrepreneur need to assess what your needs are and have discernment on what you're willing to experiment with and have some sort of way of measuring your results on if it's working or not. Um, it's more process and less concrete. I'm all about process.

Jade:

I feel like too, when it comes to posting and I'm coming from like an artist perspective, like I said, I'm still always in process of bridging the gap between like creating art and interacting with my art from the perspective as of an entrepreneur. But there are times when. In my process, sharing is not a part of it. Like I need to be just fully immersed in what I'm going through and to share on social media is like trying to

Alysha:

like, uh, like uproot a seed

Jade:

that's, that's planting and germinating and like trying to dig it up instead of just letting it grow and then, ah, like sharing when. It's ready, I guess. And I know that there's another side to that where it's like, well, is it ever ready? You gotta get outta your comfort zone and just share. But there are a lot of times, uh, where it's just a very full yes in my body to, to take a step back and, and seize from sharing, even though engagement is high or I'm developing a, a momentum, like sometimes I just get called to stop so I can receive whatever the next. Phase of my

Adam:

processes. Okay. We don't work for an algorithm. It's all tools. Yeah. And it should be framed as such. There's no, uh, I keep using the word should. I hate that word, . Frame it as such. It's tools. It's not expectations, it's not step by step. We have to set aside the idea that if van right, if this van. And start zooming out and looking at things a little bit more holistically, right? Like, like baseline, like social media aside as an entrepreneur, what problems can you solve? Literally make a list of the problems that you can solve in the world, and then how do you service your process of solving those problems? Then get a couple of, a couple of, um, case studies. You know, hit a home run with them, then capture their success story so you can use that as amplification. And then how do you systematize, right? Like these four things. How do you procedurize templatize? These four things are way more valuable than should I be posting on social media. If you don't have these four things figured out, you're posting on social media for other reasons than to scale your. That's what it's about. Social media is about garnishing and gathering attention so that you can scale yourself, but, and it's also about telling your story, right? And so I feel like sometimes as entrepreneurs, we get caught up in the idea that we have to use social media to grow our income, to grow our revenue. Um, but, and the question you should be asking yourself is, how am I inspired to give value? And again, that's those four things that I just articulated. So many entrepreneurs have no fucking clue what problems they solve. They just know they like to do this one thing and they think that's enough, but it doesn't enter the psychology of the individual who they're trying to transact with. We need to understand life behind their eyes, and they're looking for solutions to specific problems and the magic. Is if you're even so advanced that you can see the problems that they need to be solved before they even know it, and you can present the information to them in such a way that it reveals to them that that is a problem that they genuinely want to solve. And now your solution set is twofold. You've provided the solution that you brought their awareness to the problem, and you're providing the solution to the problem itself. Mm-hmm. It's easy to think that entrepreneurialism is all about content, all about content. Content is the way content is. Later on in the process. If you don't have that other stuff figured out, you can make content. Sure, absolutely. But your attention also. Is going to be very, very valuable on those other things.

Alysha:

Sometimes I get so caught up in, I'm going through something and I'm almost like trying to process it to find a lesson so that I can share it and it's like, that's like not the point. You know what I mean? It's like just so that I can be like, oh, okay. Because I don't know, there's just so much noise online about how you need to obviously document instead of create, but sometimes like that's not healthy. Right? And you going through these experiences is not just for you to share and boost on social media and stuff like that. It's for you to become a better human and to, to really learn and grow. And so I think that's really, um, potent and. Something that I wanted to dive into too, based on what you were just saying, Adam, is it's caused me a lot of anxiety in the past, and I'd love to know your guys' perspective on it, but this whole idea of like market before you create. Your services because that's something that's causing a lot of anxiety of like, I'm just bullshitting. Like I'm just being like, Hey, like here. You know what I mean? Like let's do business. But the foundation isn't really a hundred percent set. And I'm wondering how we can support other empathetic

Adam:

entrepreneurs maybe with that. Well, I mean, that's the age old question, right? The chicken energy egg is ultimately what you're saying. Um, and so I think at the core of that, psychologically speaking, I think there's value in the process of trusting that you can figure it out. Mm-hmm. , right? Like your capacity to figure it out is valuable in and of itself. So I have nothing against selling things that you've never done before or don't know how to do yet, assuming you're not one of those people that over promises and under delivers. Mm-hmm. . Right? That's a huge phenomenon. Guilty on parts of my journey. In my entrepreneurial experience. Um, and so, you know, that's a part of the experience making sales and learning how to fulfill those sales if you, if you haven't, even if it doesn't go as according to plan. Gives you more experience in the process, gives you more experience as an entrepreneur and will inform your process moving forward. I think it's a yes. And like, let's take voice and impact. For example, you know, voice and impact at this point is, is reaching. Its seven month birthday next month. Woohoo. Um, and at the beginning, you know, I was really considering, well, do I just become. You know, sort of like a coaching platform, do I just help people tap into their emotional awareness, help recover from trauma, find clarity on their sense of trajectory and vision in their life, put systems together that can help them manage their time and optimize their results. And I just had a part of me that was like, oh gosh, if I do that, I feel like I'm gonna miss out on so much. So I didn't even know what voice and impact was going to be yet. And so all I did was define sort of like a wider umbrella of, okay, well I know I can do media, Video production, storytelling, strategy, whatever. I know I can do systems, websites, automation systems, membership portals, online courses. And then I was like, okay, I'm just gonna put that whole umbrella together and I'm just gonna go to market. I'm just gonna start articulating my values. Because that's what I am. I'm a values driven person, and if people wanna work with me, it's because of my values. Generally speaking. That is true. And then what ended up happening is the market revealed to me where the opportunity was. Right, and so that's the thing. It's like find clarity in yourself on what feels appropriate, what problems you feel like you can solve, and then also pay attention to the market and see what opportunities, you know, you can show up to. It's those two things constantly. An inner awareness of reflection of your sense of values, an outer awareness of what is needed from me, an inner awareness of reevaluation after this experience. What do I want? I learned after that project. What's new for me? An outer awareness is how does the market respond? What's next? What do people need from me? How can I be of service over and over and over, and over and over forever. That's the, that's gonna happen forever as an entre. And so, um, I don't know how directly that answers your question, but it's important for, again, for us to look at things holistically, uh, gotta inform the process.

Alysha:

I really appreciate the yes and approach and perspective because it's like there's. Uh, and I don't wanna sound like I'm being negative or anything, but it's like there's so many people out there that are like, this is the way, like this is the way you do it, but it's like, that's the way you did it. But it's like, yes. And holistically coming from the inside out. I love that perspective. And personally, it's been very, uh, like calming for me to be on social media and do my business with Now adopting that approach as well, that you've, that you've taught,

Adam:

you used the language the way, which is actually a Daoist princip. The Dallas Way is essentially the idea that your reality right now as it stands is the path forward. The way is the portal, the way is individual. The way is a sacred individual process that can't be defined by anybody else because your experience right now as it stands is the. So you're always on the path. The way is always right now, right here, you know, um, the doe ching, if you've never read that, it's a very poetic expression of all of the complexities of life and, and for anybody to standardize or formulate a principle, um, with the idea of, of like, Hey, this is the right thing for you. I think it's troubling because there is a sacred. In the individual, but, and , or Yes, and . You know, sometimes those standardized things can be really helpful because we can learn from them and we can synthesize that information to apply it practically to our current experience. So, um, you know, you are the gatekeeper. You're the only one that's ever gonna know what's best for you. But, and there are people who are more experienced than you that might have something that's worth listening to and trying on.

Jade:

I think trying on is a great way to put it too, because sometimes something might work for a little bit and then it's time to try something new. So like experimenting with something and discovering it as something that works for you is fantastic. Um, but it's usually not to be attached to, at least in my experience, that's been something. I have had to learn because I will, you know, read something or implement something new, a new way of doing something, and I'm like, this is the way I discovered it. I've arrived. Yay. I figured it out. And then that thing stops working. And I'm like, well, what happened ? And it's like, okay, that was meant to serve me for a certain amount of time. And to have the, the present moment awareness to recognize when things need to change or things are changing and you just. Like awaken to that is, is really important,

Adam:

which brings us to the core principle that I'm, I've probably said in every episode and will continue to, which is like, life is a process of evolution. That's the whole point. The whole point of life is to evolve and grow. So things are gonna change all the time. You might set down this business and start a new one. Your business might change entirely. So to tie it back to what we were talking, Um, you know, the way is all about that, that two things, awareness of what your sense of opportunity is and observation of where the opportunity is in response to that in the market, the inner and the outer, which fun fact, the intersection of the inner and the outer is the voice. I talk about that all the time.

Alysha:

That. Yeah. I can hear some of your experiences on this because I've been experiencing this really interesting, I don't know, uh, I don't wanna call it phenomenon, but it's like with all of that pressure taken off of like, I need to be on social media every single day promoting my stuff, blah, blah, blah, blah, versus like going from the showing. Of all of that to the actual like embodying and telling and actually getting out there and talking about what I'm doing and talking to different people and networking a little bit more in person, being in my joy. Online opportunities have like manifested in front of me, you know, without even having to really put out a lot of content without having to like go and do sales all the time online and stuff like that. By actually just being in the joy and focusing on the in-person element of being proud of my business and talking about all these different things that I'm passionate about, it's like the universe and the online people have somehow been attracted to me, and I'm wondering what your guys' experiences have been with that, especially in. Just being in your joy and seeing what comes from that . And I see you smiling, Jada. You have an experience like that.

Jade:

Yeah. So many. It's like a, you're a magnet, right? So when you are grounded and feeling fully, you, I know that's kind of, um, like a simple way of putting it. But when you're feeling charged and like. Like you said in your joy, you're, you're feeling like the adult within you and the inner child in you are harmonizing. You are on top of your stuff. You feel aligned with your mission when you just feel balanced and, and in harmony with yourself and with the present moment. That doesn't mean being happy, but just like content and like fully, huh, like here with yourself. I do, it is like a magnetic force versus if you're thinking, oh, I should be doing this to help my business. That, like, that feeling, it's like the stress on your shoulders and the, the, the like mental blocks that that can create, that can like prevent you from seeing where your opportunity really is. Um, Yeah, I mean, I've had many experiences where when I am relaxed in my life, opportunities just happen. I don't have to go out and fight for them. I just, I follow my intuition wherever I feel called to go, and it just, it happens. Maybe that sounds a little bit like, uh, but yeah, I think there's a lot of truth to that.

Adam:

Let's enter the world through your, your eyes and enter your shoes for a second. I imagine when you're opening up the social media platform under that lens, if I should be doing this, this is the thing that's gonna help me grow my community. You know, it feels probably forced, right? It feels a little bit less authentic. It feels a little bit trying to make a bottom line. I'm trying to sell myself. I'm trying to create results, and there's usually a lot of feelings of effort associated with. Whereas in the later half where you're kind of realizing, okay, I'm gonna set the social media down for a second. I'm gonna enter in the space of the real world, which fun fact still exists. I know there's a lot of excitement about social media platforms. I know Web three is really fun and exciting, and the way of re-imagining how these ecosystems can be created, particularly in the financial sector and how money flows is super exciting. But the real world still fucking. Right. And so when we set that down and we really enter in the real world, we as human beings belong in the real world. That's where we're gonna feel most fulfilled. And then when we pick them back up, once we're in integrated in the real world, that should, energy is probably less present. That feeling of creativity is probably stronger. The feeling of what am I inspired to say today feels probably a little bit more casual. And that sort of subtle energy is palpable. Like we as human beings through our mirror neurons and empathetic capacities can pick up on that kind of thing, even if it's only on a sub subconscious capacity. And so it's hard not to just bring to our attention that that has an effect to it. Both for you as the user of the application and your experience in the process of creating content for that application and for the people who are engaging with you, uh, through the application. But, you know, to directly correlate it to the other side of the question, which is like, well, hey, I sat down the social media, but, and I'm getting more results on social media. You know, that gets a little metaphysical, right? Um, and we've talked about this a lot. We've talked about the idea of, you know, you can't just think your way into opportunity or manifest opportunity through your emotions, cuz then it's just all about controlling yourself and fuck, it sucks to feel controlled by yourself or by anybody else. And so the, like, the real attractive force is action, action and gratitude. Those two things. Trump feelings and thinking 20 times out. And so it sounds to me in this context, Alicia, you're more aligned with your actions. You're, you're following through and doing things that previously you weren't. And one of those things is setting down social media and reevaluating the relationship with her. And it seems like the universe is, is filling that hole, is providing the opportunities that feel aligned with you as a response of that inspired. You know, we're, we're, we're, we're here to do things. Yes, we are human beings. We're here to be too. But if you find your state of being and doing is an extension of that state of being, that's where the magic happens. There's real problems in the world that need our help right now. Real problems. It's not our job to save it, but it's our job to do our part. Are you doing your part? My. Chances are if you're listening to this podcast, the answer is yes, and I commend you and I'm very grateful for your contributions to the world.

Alysha:

I also sort of wanna explore this idea of, I think, you know, social media is a blessing and a curse in our day and age today. And you know, a. Blessing because it's such a wonderful resource for humanity to connect and share perspectives as we are very actively doing. Um, but you know, there's the unrealistic, superficial kind of comparisonitis dumpster fire to our psyches that it perpetuates. And I'd love to hear some of your thoughts or approaches to, you know, making the online world or making social media a little bit more of a blessing and some of your

Adam:

philosophies around. I think the answer to that question is a lot more reflective of the user who is consuming the content than it is the user who's creating it. Just be, be aware of your attention, like become conscious of what your attention is going towards, where your attention is, grows. Your attention is water, like water to. Right. We water plants to help them grow your attention. Waters what it is you want in your life to grow, right? Um, so are you watching things that are troubling? Are you watching things that are intentionally numbing you out from the things in your life that you need to face? So like, be a conscious consumer of your content in the. And then on the other side of that, that's the consumer side, the creator side is, are you articulating things that you believe in? You know, I always talk about the process of honoring the, honoring your word. So is what you're saying truthful? Is it honest? Um, yeah. I mean, just give a damn care about the message that you're sharing. Be honest. Speak towards your values, beliefs, and principles. Um, and then, then the content that the consumers are, are engaging in certainly have more potential in them. And then, right, that's the consumer and the, the creator. And then there's the third factor, which is actually the algorithm. And we have to remember that these algorithms are incredibly advanced and their whole purpose is, Capture as much attention for as long as time as possible. That's why they exist and there's lots of potential manipulative forces that can exist within that principle. Right. And so we've talked about this a lot in the context of like, okay, well we can agree that let's say Facebook for example, Facebook is causing a lot of harm in the world. I think we can agree to that. There's a lot of psychological warfare. That happens on Facebook. And I think we can also acknowledge Facebook is doing some things to try to eliminate it, but, and it's hard to eliminate something that is so deeply ingrained in the algorithmic principles, but the way that I see it is I could either go, oh my God, Facebook sucks. I'm gonna avoid their platform. I'm never gonna use it. I'm never gonna invest at them. Or I can go, oh my gosh, all of these people who are habitually sucked into the vortex of. While Facebook is on fire and causing harm, like I think of this like in the olden days, right? Like, like if there's a castle sort of kingdom and the kingdom is all on fire, am I just gonna get on my horse and like ride past the fire and go, oh, hey, kingdom's on fire. I guess I'm just gonna keep moving forward. Or am I gonna get on my horse? I'm gonna go into the fucking fire and I'm gonna try to help as many people as I can. To me, that's what content. It's going into ecosystems that are damaging to the human, human, uh, psychology that can be damaging, that have the potential to be damaging and are used as an intentional tool to manipulate and, and, and control, and trying to bring voices to the principle of personal freedom, to the principle of personal empower. Um, and, and trying to get those people out of the fire to help them, to help them take control of their life and go in a way that feels meaningful and inspiring to them. Not as a prescription of my diagnoses, but as a, as a message of you have everything you need right now to do anything that you wanna do. So what do you wanna do? And are you willing to face the things you need to face to do it? The real question I'd like for you to reflect on. So it's about consumer, it's about creator. But there is this third element that's hard not to avoid. That isn't human. That is not human, which means it doesn't have emotions, it doesn't give a damn on how the results impact human beings. And that's where I get lit up. That's where my values live. Because then if it can be used as a tool of harm, how can it be used as a tool for nourishment, regeneration, inspiration, livelihood? And I think it can be, and I think it's in our hands as the consumers and as the creators, probably more so in the hands of as consumer. Than, than the creators. So that's go going back to consciously consume your content. If we all consumed content that nourished us, the algorithm would go, oh wow. Look, the nourishing content is preferred. It keeps their attentions. Let's amplify that stuff. And so healing ourselves I think is a part of that conscious process of consuming and creating. Yeah. Here's a truth bomb about this. As you heal yourself, as you become aware of the wounds that you have and tend to them, you may find people around you not liking the person you're becoming. You may find people around you feeling more judgmental and, and acknowledging that you're going against the grain. Um, you can't take anybody with you, period. You can only inspire the people around you by being self-evident of the principle of progress, but you can't take anybody with you. And so you may reach thresholds of existence where you need to let go of people that you've longed cared for, or at very least redefine what that relationship looks like. And that's why a lot of people on the path of this say like, wow, sometimes it's really lone.

Alysha:

That actually happened, yeah. To me just recently and, you know, sharing my truth both in, in person and online. I had one of my good friends that I considered a best friend say, I've been seeing everything that you've been talking about recently, and honestly, I just don't jive with it. I was supposed to be a bridesmaid in her wedding. She's like, I don't want you at my wedding anymore. We're just not aligned. And I was. Honestly a little bit relieved. Cause I was, I was like, if I had to go sort of back into, Not being myself or like not being able to be expressive this way or understood or, you know what I mean, accepted in this way, then I don't really wanna be there. And it kind of sucks to be rejected in that way, but it's so freeing to know that. They're letting me go and I get to let them go and I get to welcome in more people that are like, you know, f e l, let's talk about tarot cards. Like , . Adam: Yeah. But, and it's not always that simple either. I love that acknowledgement and I appreciate that. I'm gonna actually tell a funny story, which is, when I was in high school, I had a, had a girlfriend, and for the longest time, the girlfriend's mother thought I was Jewish. And so at this particular moment in my life, I was pretty atheistic. I didn't really believe in any higher powers, very intellectual, um, material is really all that mattered to me. And so when she sat down and she asked, well, then what do you, what do you believe in? I said, oh, well, I'm kind of atheist right now. And she looked at me and she said, ah, I liked you better when you were a Jew and right. And so I'm saying, Purely to articulate the idea that sometimes people love us for our masks, and then when we, when we garner up the garnish up, gather up the courage, garner to take our masks off, and then we're met by the people who we thought love us saying, oh, that's not the version of you I love, it's just, it's an interest. Thing, and just because you closed one door doesn't mean that the other door is always going to open. Sometimes we feel like because we close a door, the next door needs to open right away, but there's this sacred experience of the in between, the in between, no longer and not yet. And my partner, Nicole, she's brilliant, she's got a company called The Space Between Wellness, which is all about navigating. Navigating that identity crisis. If I am no longer this, but I don't know who I am yet, I don't know what's next. I just know that this is no longer, that is a sacred space too worthy of contemplation and understanding.

Jade:

That's what I was gonna say is there's a lot of value in loneliness. Like especially if what catalyzes it is you courageously. Embodying your truth and the rejection can super suck, but it sucks. It sucks. Nice . It's a nice, it's a nice struggle cuz you're like, ah, like this is really hard. But I know that this is right for me. And the loneliness is where personally for me, I find the most. Uh, creative excavation. I guess I would say. I get, I learned so much about myself in those periods because who else are you gonna, like if the loneliness is a product of you saying hello to yourself? So, following through with that, You learn so much about yourself in those, those laps periods. And before you know it, you look back, you're like, whoa. I was a totally, I mean, you're the same. You're, you're you, but you're like, it feels like you were a totally different person months ago cuz you were living your life in a different way. And that transitional period is, can be really rather treacherous, but there's um, For me, there's always been a sense of like, huh, like you said, Alicia, relief, that like it, it hurts to be rejected, but at the same time you're like, that was an aligned rejection. I kind of needed that, that tie to be severed and what Adam said about how sometimes the door doesn't open right away. Sometimes the door that closes also reopens later on too. Sometimes like. Somebody being like, eh, this isn't for me. Or you like I've had, okay, so here's an example from my life that's kind of funny. My best friend in high school, like we were homies for years. The first time I met her I was like, I don't like her. And she thought the same thing about me. Like as soon as we met each other, we were like, I don't know who this is, but like, we're wearing the same band shirt. And I just, I think she's a poser. Like we just didn't like each other. We immediately had this like hmm. And then best friends for years. And sometimes the things that like are for us, just aren't for us right in that moment. And it's the same with us. And like when we come out and use our voices and some people are like, eh, Maybe later on they'll come around and be like, actually there's something here. And vice

Adam:

versa. Yeah. How often in our lives are we spent pretending? We're pretending Our culture is full of pretending, and pretending is not aligned with the like principle of human, it's like against our nature to pretend. And so when we're pretending, even though it's what we know, it's very uncom. It's super uncomfortable, right? It can feel like depression. It can feel like anxiety. It can feel like all of these things, which those are just symptoms of the bigger idea, which is we are just pretending. And so sometimes these, um, aligned, what did you call it? Jade aligned. Aligned rejections. Sometimes these aligned rejections can feel relieving because then I no longer have to pretend I no longer have to be somebody. I'm. Which opens up room to be be more you. There's so many people I've met in my life who feel like they're the only one going through what they're going through, and I honor that and I acknowledge that, but, and as you have grown to hear me say, there are so many people in the world experiencing something like that. And so though you may not have crossed their paths, I think it's comforting just to acknowledge that they're there and if you acknowledge they're there, you can look for them. And if you can look for them, you can find them. And if you can find them, I'll let you fill in the blank there.

Alysha:

And I think that's such a, a beautiful way to wrap up as well, because. You know, I've heard this saying before that loneliness is a sign that you're in desperate need of yourself. And once you're able to do that dis like self discovery and homecoming in a sense, um, it really is so beautiful the way that you're able, I feel like emotional now, , um, able to like express that in the world and. Amplify that through the work that you wanna do, whether it is online, in person, whatever it is. Right. And so, uh, yeah, I'd love to know any sort of final thoughts that you have around this.

Adam:

I mean, the, the, the, the very direct thing that comes to me is just sort of a you matter. . Right. I feel like a lot of the feelings of loneliness or feelings of challenge when we say goodbye to relationships or the feelings of challenge that we experience when we're not creating entrepreneurial success, whatever that means to you or results, is a feeling of like, oh, I don't matter what I have to, the world is invaluable. Mm-hmm. , what I give to the world is invaluable. This is so just a general you. From my heart to yours. What you, how you contribute to the world is really, really, uh, important. And I don't mean that as a sense of obligation to make sure how you contribute to the world is right. I mean that as a sense of how you're already contributing to the world matters. Um, but, and experiment. Experiment with how you're contributing to the world. Don't just get comfortable and stay there. Try new things. Become more aware of yourself, become more aware of the problems you're trying to solve, become more aware of the people who are looking for those sorts of solutions sets. Get out there, meet people. Share your ideas. Share your vision. Share your values. Um, pay attention. You know, keep your eyes up, keep your eyes peeled. Um, there's, there's just a lot of richness in this conversation. You know, knowledge becomes power when it is applied. So don't just think about all the learning. Don't just analyze all the learning, apply it. Experiment, experiment, experiment, experiment, experiment. Well, that's a wrap. Again, this is Voice and Impact podcast. My name is Adam. Thanks for being here. Thanks for being you. Thanks for doing all the good things you do, and we'll see you next week.